Restoring Density

Restoring Density

Across Canada, a renewed interest in urbanity is leading to density increases unheard of in more than a generation. As Corporate Knights writes, not all density is equal however. As the country works to reduce its carbon footprint, accommodate new residents and improve the cost efficiency of its infrastructure, creating “density done well” is essential. Smart policy and strategic planning coupled with an eye for the human scale will be imperative to successful density in Canada.

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Federal Infrastructure Investment in Canada

Federal Infrastructure Investment in Canada

Canada’s infrastructure deficit is estimated to be $123 billion and growing. This wasn’t lost on national politicians during the recent national election, with the winning Liberal party promising $125 billion for infrastructure over the next decade. In the lead up to the new federal budget, ReNew Canada outlined what they expect to see. It includes major funding for Canada’s big cities, big investments in public transit, and consistent, long-term funding for municipalities. As Renew Canada notes, “If you build stuff, it should be a busy few years ahead.”

Mobility Planning that Builds Better Cities

Mobility Planning that Builds Better Cities

What does the future of transportation in (North) American cities look like? Ecolocalizer tackled this huge question in a recent post. Notably, they foresee fewer private cars on the road, identifying four key factors influencing mobility of the future: technology, a planning evolution, driverless cars, and policy. While they underline that the impacts are difficult to predict (especially for driverless cars), new technologies, good planning and well-crafted policy appear set to contribute to a future of increasingly people-friendly cities.

Sustainable Mobility: Time for Disruption

Sustainable Mobility: Time for Disruption

Resulting in a global agreement, COP21 was an important step towards limiting the impacts of climate change. However, as The Dirt writes, it was only a starting point. Transportation accounts for the second largest share of energy-related emissions and presents a major opportunity for improvement. Disruption to car-oriented planning, particularly in secondary cities, would have a major impact on CO2 emissions and can also be a major employment driver, as demonstrated in Copenhagen and Brazilian cities. Urban mobility – a catalyst for greener, more successful cities.

Drones in the City

Drones in the City

As drones move from a rare novelty to ubiquitous tool, questions about their role in cities have steadily increased. While many concerns persist, according to New York magazine, the proliferation of drones could also help solve many challenges cities face today. Car-free delivery, infrastructure analysis and disaster relief or noise, chaos and crashes? The urban impact of drones could be widespread. The big question is whether they will be a good thing for cities.

The Future Value of Parking

The Future Value of Parking

“Will parking spaces in cities become more, or less, valuable in the future?” Architect This City asked. On the surface, it sounds innocent enough, but under the fresh pavement, the quiet rumble of disruption can be heard. As we’ve written about before, urban mobility in the not-too-distant-future could look quite different. ATC’s article focuses on cost, but if the cost of parking drops, how will underused parking lots and structures – the low-hanging fruit of infill development – be used?

The Global Growth of Complete Streets

The Global Growth of Complete Streets

Are streets for cars or people? As the environmental, social and equity impacts of the private car on cities are better understood, a complete streets approach, which provides an alternative to car-oriented planning and design is catching on around the world. The rise of complete streets, which accommodate the needs of a diversity of users, has been accompanied by a range of valuable new resource, which the Victoria Transportation Policy Institute‘s Todd Litman details in a recent Planetizen article.