Rising Water: Benefit from Change or Suffer from Stagnation

Rising Water: Benefit from Change or Suffer from Stagnation

Re-thinking human relationships with water is critical for climate change adaptation. Waterfront cities have undertaken a range of initiatives to address sea-level rise and future water deficiency. Shaped like an upside-down umbrella, Tåsinge Plads, a public space in Copenhagen, uses clever landscaping and materials to both manage flood control and increase quality of life. The collaborative designs overcame restraints of traditional engieneering solutions. Would you agree that today’s complicated issues are better served by creative multidisciplinary approaches?

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Green Learning

Green Learning

It is well-established that school design affects learning. Now, evidence is emerging that views and surrounding landscapes have big impacts too. The Dirt has a new article about a University of Illinois study that found green views led to better attentional functioning and stress recovery after short breaks from academic activities. For designers, architects and landscape architects, this suggests that designs and retrofits that maximize indoor views of trees and greenery enhance the learning environment and further support academic success.

Sustainable Mobility: Time for Disruption

Sustainable Mobility: Time for Disruption

Resulting in a global agreement, COP21 was an important step towards limiting the impacts of climate change. However, as The Dirt writes, it was only a starting point. Transportation accounts for the second largest share of energy-related emissions and presents a major opportunity for improvement. Disruption to car-oriented planning, particularly in secondary cities, would have a major impact on CO2 emissions and can also be a major employment driver, as demonstrated in Copenhagen and Brazilian cities. Urban mobility – a catalyst for greener, more successful cities.

Will Vertical Farming Go Mainstream?

Will Vertical Farming Go Mainstream?

Since it’s inception in 1999, vertical farming has developed from an experimental concept to a serious business opportunity that could enhance urban sustainability and resilience. Based on a simple concept of growing food where most people live, scientists and entrepreneurs have worked to reduce costs and overcome challenges. As City Metric writes, many issues have been resolved and discussions have moved on to more nuanced challenges. We may be on the verge of a major transformation in how we feed our cities.

 

What COP21 Means to Urban Planners

What COP21 Means to Urban Planners

After long nights, intense negotiating, and ultimately the most important international climate deal in history, it’s time to get to work. Home to the majority of the world’s population, and with about 1/3 of the carbon budget to stay under 2 degrees, cities have a big role to play. But how will they achieve this? Next City provides a review of key issues and opportunities for resilience, economies of scale, financing, cooperation among multiple levels of government and with the private sector.

The Widespread Health Benefits of Urban Nature

The Widespread Health Benefits of Urban Nature

Doctor’s are becoming more aware of the health benefits of urban nature, some are even prescribing time in green spaces for patients. We’ve written about this before, and now, CityLab has compiled a thorough review of the identified mental and physical health benefits resulting from exposure to urban nature. It seems that the future of health care… is green.

The Urban Future is Green

The Urban Future is Green

Big news out of Oslo, Norway today. The capital city of a nation that produces nearly two billion barrels of oil a day announced that not only would its city centre be car free by 2019, it would also divest from fossil fuels by 2020. They also plan to halve emissions by 2020 and become fossil fuel free by 2030. In the run up to COP21, this is another indication that cities are leading the way on energy policy.