Everything is Connected to Everything Else

Everything is Connected to Everything Else

In the 50 years since the release of  The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Jane Jacobs‘ work has been celebrated and critiqued in a diversity of ways. Best known for exuding the benefits of walkable, human-scale neighbourhoods, her introduction of the “web way of thinking” to urbanism is an under-appreciated contribution. Planetizen emphasizes this in a list of Jane Jacobs’ 10 most important (and misunderstood) lessons. City-making professions are taking steps towards  holistic perspectives and diminished silos, but a half-century on, Jane’s work still has many lessons to offer.

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Ecology, Design Patterns & the Self-Building City

Ecology, Design Patterns & the Self-Building City

While a resurgence in mixed-use development has contributed to more human-scale districts, Färgfabriken‘s Jan Ryden argues in a recent article for Volume, that it often lacks the diversity Jane Jacobs championed, driving up costs and limiting fine grain development. He proposes the re-application of Christopher Alexander’s design language to urbanism. The article critiques large developers but, ironically, this strategy could create new business opportunities for these very companies.